Community Outreach

Encouraging Local Involvement

Conservationists often see local communities as enemies because they are a main source of environmental threats. After all, who else can be blamed if not the ones who are cutting down the trees, polluting the environment, and killing protected species? Yet this view ignores the reality that these communities are themselves the ones most strongly affected by the health of local ecosystems. Everyone relies on natural resources to survive, and many communities unfortunately only know how to meet these needs by exploiting the natural world.

We believe that local communities are valuable partners. Our organization’s name–Adopt a Panama Rainforest–proves our commitment to localized conservation and represents our challenge to you. All of us benefit when communities take ownership of the local environment, supporting healthy ecosystems by living more sustainably, from the smallest animals to the largest cities!

The Global Perspective

We all live in different places, have different interests, and work in different fields. Yet, despite these differences, there is one thing we all share: the Earth. We are all part of the global community and all of us are responsible for keeping our planet healthy.

Although ADOPTA focuses our conservation efforts in Panama, local actions can have global effects. After all, the environment does not follow human borders. If a migratory bird like a Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) dies in its breeding grounds in Canada, for instance, that bird will also disappear from its range in Central and South America. But protecting migrants in their breeding grounds is hard because their populations are spread out over a large area. Besides, most migratory bird deaths occur during migration–it is more likely that a thrush will die while traveling than in its breeding grounds. Conservation efforts in Panama can therefore have a disproportionately strong effect for migratory bird populations because the narrow geography funnels billions of migrants through a comparatively small area in the middle of their journeys.

At the same time, sometimes global action is needed to solve local problems. Panama’s beaches are littered with garbage that washes in from throughout the eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and while we can manage this problem with volunteer clean up events, we can not fix the problem as long as trash continues arriving from other countries. Environmental threats like climate change and pollution are too big for any one person, group, or country to tackle, but our small actions can combine to make a world of difference.

8

Million tons of plastic enter the ocean every year.

9/10

People around the world breathe very polluted air.

(Click to view full size)

Proportions of well-studied organisms categorized by global threatened status (EW – Extinct in the Wild, CR – Critically Endangered, EN – Endangered, VU – Vulnerable, NT – Near Threatened, DD – Data Deficient, LC – Least Concern). The verticla red lines represent the best estimate of the total percent of the group considered threatened. Adapted from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

(Click to view full size)

Proportions of well-studied organisms categorized by global threatened status (EW – Extinct in the Wild, CR – Critically Endangered, EN – Endangered, VU – Vulnerable, NT – Near Threatened, DD – Data Deficient, LC – Least Concern). The verticla red lines represent the best estimate of the total percent of the group considered threatened. Adapted from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

8

Million tons of plastic enter the ocean every year.

9/10

People around the world breathe very polluted air.

Our Activities

ADOPTA involves local communities in everything that we do. Working with regional volunteers allows us to adjust our projects to meet area-specific needs (our reforestation efforts, for example, have to match the type of ecosystem we’re working in) while also encouraging individuals to become conservation leaders who can advocate for their local environment. Volunteers also help us connect with the wider community at public events where people can interact with the natural world in a safe, fun way through activities like birdwatching or art projects.

Community Events

Community Events

There are countless reasons to love the natural world, and events are held throughout the year to celebrate the environment! Some, like Harpy Eagle Day, pay tribute to charismatic species, while others, like National Reforestation Day, encourage people to give back to nature and reverse some of the damage humans have done to the environment. For more information, and to stay updated with our activities, follow us on social media @adoptaBosque:

Community Events

There are countless reasons to love the natural world, and events are held throughout the year to celebrate the environment! Some, like Harpy Eagle Day, pay tribute to charismatic species, while others, like National Reforestation Day, encourage people to give back to nature and reverse some of the damage humans have done to the environment. For more information, and to stay updated with our activities, follow us on social media @adoptaBosque: