Citizen Science

Citizen Science

Researchers want your help!

As technology has advanced, and as cameras have become increasingly common, it is now easier than ever for everyday citizens to engage with scientists around the world to share observations and access high-quality information. We are now in a new era of science, where every person can contribute meaningful data to address real-world problems!

In citizen science, individuals voluntarily participate in gathering, sharing, and analyzing data. Sometimes this information is gathered as part of a specific activity or project, like the Global Big Day which aims to observe as many birds as possible around the world in a single day. However, there are also many online databases such as iNaturalist and eBird which gather citizen observations without any specific project in mind to build a dataset which can be applied to many different studies.

Participating in these activities has been shown to improve scientific literacy and understanding among the general public and also encourages citizens to take ownership of their local environments. At the same time, citizen science efforts provide a lot of information that can be used in more robust studies–it’s a win-win for everybody!

Researchers want your help!

As technology has advanced, and as cameras have become increasingly common, it is now easier than ever for everyday citizens to engage with scientists around the world to share observations and access high-quality information. We are now in a new era of science, where every person can contribute meaningful data to address real-world problems!

In citizen science, individuals voluntarily participate in gathering, sharing, and analyzing data. Sometimes this information is gathered as part of a specific activity or project, like the Global Big Day which aims to observe as many birds as possible around the world in a single day. However, there are also many online databases such as iNaturalist and eBird which gather citizen observations without any specific project in mind to build a dataset which can be applied to many different studies.

Participating in these activities has been shown to improve scientific literacy and understanding among the general public and also encourages citizens to take ownership of their local environments. At the same time, citizen science efforts provide a lot of information that can be used in more robust studies–it’s a win-win for everybody!

Researchers want your help!

As technology has advanced, and as cameras have become increasingly common, it is now easier than ever for everyday citizens to engage with scientists around the world to share observations and access high-quality information. We are now in a new era of science, where every person can contribute meaningful data to address real-world problems!

In citizen science, individuals voluntarily participate in gathering, sharing, and analyzing data. Sometimes this information is gathered as part of a specific activity or project, like the Global Big Day which aims to observe as many birds as possible around the world in a single day. However, there are also many online databases such as iNaturalist and eBird which gather citizen observations without any specific project in mind to build a dataset which can be applied to many different studies.

Participating in these activities has been shown to improve scientific literacy and understanding among the general public and also encourages citizens to take ownership of their local environments. At the same time, citizen science efforts provide a lot of information that can be used in more robust studies–it’s a win-win for everybody!

2021 important dates

(Click on the photos to go to the event's page)

National

Bird Count

March 21

City Nature

Challenge

April 30 – May 9

Global

Big Day

May 8

2021 important dates

2021 important dates

(Click on the photos to go to the event's page)

National Bird Count

March 21

City Nature Challenge

April 30 – May 9

Global Big Day

May 8

Citizen Science Databases

Citizen Science Databases

Submitting your nature observations to online databases is one of the best ways to support scientific efforts as a citizen. Fee free to use the databases discussed below to get started, but also feel free to find other databases–there are many citizen science databases, all with unique focuses and different pros and cons.

Managed by the Ornithology Laboratory of Cornell University in New York, USA, eBird is a database for bird lists. Create a free account at ebird.org and download the app to your cell phone to start tracking the birds you see!

A database for observations of any species around the world. It's generally expected that records include evidence like a photo or recording so that other naturalists in the iNaturalist community can help with identifying the species. Join the community by creating a free account at iNaturalist.org and downloading the app for your cell phone!

Managed by the Ornithology Laboratory of Cornell University in New York, USA, eBird is a database for bird lists. Create a free account at ebird.org and download the app to your cell phone to start tracking the birds you see!

A database for observations of any species around the world. It's generally expected that records include evidence like a photo or recording so that other naturalists in the iNaturalist community can help with identifying the species. Join the community by creating a free account at iNaturalist.org and downloading the app for your cell phone!